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Archive for the ‘Entree’ Category


Sorry Cory, I never measure ingredients in this recipe as there was no recipe to follow.  I saw my mom’s friend did it once more than 20 years ago and I have been following that method (may not be the best / most traditional) all year long.

Next time when I make it again, I will try to measure how much approximately I make with and will take more step to step pictures for you!

Don’t quote me on that, It’s really just a guess of what I’m putting in…  I never thought of recording it.

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Homemade simple bulgogee Seasoned meat patty, learned from a talented mommy from a FB forum.  So it’s very kids friendly, yet yummy enough for adults.

Combine “Soy sauce, applesauce, garlic, onion and maybe some sugar if anyone likes it sweeter”

So I think the proportion to marinate 1 pound of ground turkey would be like:

  • 1  tablespoon soy sauce (or more?  usually kids don’t eat as salty)
  • 2 tablespoon applesauce
  • 3 cloves minced garlic
  • 2 tbsp chopped onion (or 1 tsp onion powder, or simply omitted)
  • 1+1/2 tbsp sugar

(obviously all mommies cook by just eye balling and never record the exact measurements… so use your cooking experience.  Safest is to premix the marinade and taste first before mixing into the meat)

 

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After the baked chicken cordon bleu, I’m tempted to bake another usually deep-fried dish with panko and my Wondra flour.  Browsing online, people have success with baking coconut shrimps.  I felt not guilty at all after eating half a pound of the baked shrimps. I guess the only fat from this dish was from the prawn and the coconut shreds.  I have an expiring bottle of lime oil, so why not add it to make the unbeatable Thai combo of lime, coconut and chili !!

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During my first 3 years of work, I needed to travel a lot to those small interior towns in BC.  I love checking out those local restaurants rather than eating at franchise chain.  In Trail, a small town whose population was only about 7000, surprisingly I found good cheap eats.  Cafe Michael was a Chinese owned French restaurant. The menu was not big, but their chicken cordon bleu was really good.  It’s not fine dining atmosphere and the side veggies were only carrots and broccoli.  Now,  I still miss their crispy chicken breast with ham inside and cheese oozing out.  I am sure they deep fry the chicken.  I recently read from Bon Appetit that Wondra superfine flour is perfect for breading meat and poultry before deep frying.

Why not try it baked?  healthier with no oil.  I skipped the butter too.

Baked Chicken Cordon Bleu with fresh thyme coating

Baked Chicken Cordon Bleu with fresh thyme coating

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I tried to look for the recipe that my friend Lolo sent me.  Last year when I was still pregnant, Shon caught a female salmon with lots of roe.  I have no idea what to do with the roes except he always use Borax to color the roes to make baits as next year.  Then Lolo called and asked to reserve roes to make japanese food.  I didn’t get to taste hers since I avoided raw food at that time.

Now I’m able to eat all kinds of raw stuff, of course I’m gonna make a batch of Ikura too using Shon’s fresh catch.  Lolo sent me some links, and explaining there were two kinds. The one using just salt is the kind you will eat at japanese restaurant.  It’s brighter nicer red color.

http://blue_moon.typepad.com/blue_lotus/2007/09/post-6.html

I always like more complex taste, so I would rather try the soy + sake + mirin.  Now I lost the recipe, will bug Lolo to send me again. I just found this site but it doesn’t have mirin..

http://umamimart.com/2011/03/japanify-ikura-shoyu-marinade/

Freshly caught female salmon - lots of roes

Freshly caught female salmon – lots of roes

Pour some 60 to 65 degrees Celsius water into the bowl and let it sit for a few minutes until the membrane is "cooked" and the roes turn opaque  color.  Use a chopstick to help swirling.  Use hands to gently remove pieces of the sac

Pour some 60 to 65 degrees Celsius water into the bowl and let it sit for a few minutes until the membrane is “cooked” and the roes turn opaque color. Use a chopstick to swirl and take the sac out. Use hands to gently separate the  little pieces of sac from the roes.

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Baked Tarragon Salmon


Wilson, Happy Birthday!!!  I can’t believe it was last year same time that I made you this meal.  It’s funny that you asked me today for the recipes and wanted to re-create the same dish this year.

I think it was trout that I made this dish with at your birthday last year.  It’s beside the salmon in Costco, or you can go to any supermarket to get a big piece of fillet of trout (but I wasn’t sure if it’s rainbow trout)  Trout also has orange flesh but has more fat yet less salmon taste.  Sockeye is very lean, but more salmon taste..  I just made this dish with sockeye salmon a few days ago and it tasted fine too.  So shouldn’t matter as long as you bake the fish perfectly.

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I saw this recipe from a chinese TV show months ago, but didn’t copy down the method / the exact amount of ingredients.  It was so simple and easy to remember, I just always wanted to try it.  Finally this past weekend, just happened I have every single ingredients in my house (except I have to get my husband to run to my mom’s house to grab a few more eggs).  I never tasted it because pregnant women cannot eat raw eggs, but I think no one can resist the silky texture of the Japanese style “hotspring” egg.

Hotspring Egg with Truffle Oil

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I always think the sweet egg sushi is for kids only.  I never touch it when it’s in the assorted sushi platter.  Nevertheless, after tasting the traditional tamagoyaki in Japan and seeing the few famous specialty “egg omelette” stores in Tsukiji  (famous fish market near Tokyo), I changed my view on this egg dish.  I think it’s so fun to learn how to make it, so today I finally used the non-stick square pan I bought a few months ago from a local Japanese market.   After trying 1-2 rolls, I kind of understand the technique of rolling a nice tamagoyaki.

Tamagoyaki (Japanese egg sushi)

  • 4 eggs
  • 1 tbsp mirin
  • dash of salt
  • 1/2 tsp light soy
  • 1/2 tbsp sugar
  • 1/2 tsp dashi powder
  • 1/2 cup water

Brush pan with oil.  Cook over 4 / 10 heat.  You really need to watch a video on Youtube to understand how to cook the egg properly.  Anyways, add a small piece of sushi rice and you get EGG SUSHI !!  (I have a post of sushi rice recipe before)

Tamago sushi, with some simple roll sushi (canned salmon + shredded pork + mayo)

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Lobster noodle


I’m sure everyone has cooked lobsters at home.  I still think steaming with garlic is the best way to enjoy this high-cholesterol high protein marine creature.   I think this is our first time doing a more proper job in preparing the lobster.  I remember throwing the whole lobster into boiling water once, then most of the time I rely on the T&T workers to clean and halve the lobster for me.   My husband wants to do it himself this time… then he complaint it was so much work at the end of the dinner.  I just realized both of us are not crazy about eating lobster.  I bought this merely because it’s on sale, and I want to reserve the heads to try making lobster bisque one day.

Steam Lobster with Garlic

Preparing Lobster:

1. Put a chopstick from the tail of a live lobster, and insert about 3-4 inches up, hold for 10 seconds.

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This recipe adapted from Food Network, with just a few changes to the original: used butter instead of olive oil, preheating oven to 375 degrees instead of 350 to lock the juice of the chicken, threw in extra ingredients as usual. Its method of pan-frying the chicken first then roasting it in the oven made the chicken so tender and juicy. It’s one of most tender chicken breast ever made at my home.

 

Pan-roasted chicken with mushroom and onions

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